Tips and Tricks

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Common Conversions

Grams to Ounces

30 grams is approximately 1 ounce .

To convert grams to ounces multiply number of grams by .0353.

 

30 grams = 1 ounce

115 grams = 4 ounces

225 grams = 8 ounces

340 grams = 12 ounces

 

Grams to Pounds

To convert grams to pounds multiply the number of grams by x 0 .0022.

225 grams = ½ pound

450 grams = 1 pound

675 grams = 1 ½ pounds

900 grams = 2 pounds

1 kilogram = 2 .21 pounds

 

Volume/Weight Equivalents

½ ounce = 1 tbsp = 3 tsp

2 ounces = ¼ cup = 4 tbsp

4 ounces = ½ cup = 8 tbsp

8 ounces = 1 cup = ½ pound

16 ounces = 2 cups = 1 pint = 1 pound

Converting Litres to Quarts

To convert litres to quarts it is almost the same measurement, common ones are listed below.

.95 litre = 1 quart

1.4 litres = 1½ quarts

1.9 litres = 2 quarts

2.85 litres = 3 quarts

 

Temperature Conversions

To convert Celsius to Fahrenheit, double the Celsius and then add 30.

 -23˚C = -10˚F or freezer storage

0˚C = 32˚F or freezing point for water 20˚C = 68˚F or room temperature

100˚C = 212˚F or boiling point for water 177˚C = 350˚F = 4 (British Gas Mark) or baking temperature

204˚C = 400˚F = 6 (British Gas Mark) or hot oven temperature

260˚C = 500˚F = 9 (British Gas Mark) or broiling temperature

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Ingredients per kilogram of meat

 

½ litre red cooking wine

1 litre water

60 grams carrots, peeled

60 grams celery root, peeled

80 grams onion, peeled

10 grams garlic, peeled

50 grams bacon, smoked

1 bay leaf

1 clove

1 tsp black peppercorns

10 grams oil

50 grams tomato paste

Salt and pepper

Ingredients per kilogram of meat

 

2 litres water

80 grams carrots, peeled

60 grams celery root, peeled

80 grams onion, peeled

60 grams leek

2 bay leaves

2 cloves

1 tsp white or black peppercorns

Salt

My Rule of Thumb for Braising

Braising is the term for cooking pieces of meat which have a lot of tissue. To braise is to cook in little liquid in a covered heavy pan. The liquid, or the humidity, together with the heat turns the tough tissue into eatable gelatin, making braising the perfect cooking method for less tender beef cuts.

 

While not difficult, braising is relatively time consuming. However, once the meat is in the oven there is plenty of time to do other things. Depending on which cut is braised, it can be also prepared a day in advance.

 

1. Sear the meat, previously seasoned with salt and pepper, in the oil, in a heavy pan until the meat is nice and brown on all sides. Take the meat of the pan.

 

2. In the same oil, slowly roast the vegetables (cut into 2x2cm cubes) and the bacon until golden brown.

 

3. Add the tomato paste and roast it with the vegetables, slowly until the paste starts caramelizing and slowly browning. 

 

4. Add 100ml cold water, stirring occasionally. Wait until the liquid has dissolved and the paste is caramelizing. Be careful that it doesn’t burn.

 

5. Repeat that step 4-5 times until the tomato paste smells like a brown sauce.

 

6. Add the red wine and the rest of the water. Bring to a boil and add all the herbs and spices.

 

7. If needed skim off the foam, add the meat, cover with a heavy lid and place the pan in the oven.

 

8. Braise until the meat is soft. Check once in a while if there is still enough liquid in the pan.

 

9. When the meat is soft, take it out of the sauce and keep warm . Skim off the grease that will be floating on top of the sauce and let the sauce reduce until it has the right consistency.

 

10. Taste for seasoning

My Rule of Thumb for Boiling

Boiling is another term for cooking pieces of meat which have a lot of tissue. To boil is to cook in a lot of liquid that covers the meat, but is not covered with a lid. The meat is boiled slightly under the boiling point in a broth. The effect is the same as braising; the liquid or the humidity together with the heat turns the tough tissue into eatable gelatin which makes it a perfect cooking method for less tender beef cuts.

 

As a cooking method, boiling is not that difficult but relatively time consuming. Once the meat is gently boiling, there is plenty of time for doing other things.

 

1. In a big pan place the washed piece of beef and add the water completely covering the meat.

 

2. Add a bit of salt and bring to the boil.

 

3. Skim off the foam which will build on top of the water.

 

4. Cut all the vegetables into 2x2cm cubes and add them together with the spices to the meat. 

 

5. Bring to a boil and let the uncovered meat boil below the boiling point, nice and slow.

 

6. Boil until the meat is soft. If the meat becomes uncovered during boiling, add just enough water to cover the meat.

 

7. When the meat is soft, take it out of the broth and keep warm. Skim off the grease that will be floating on top of the sauce and check the seasoning. If the broth is not strong enough in taste, let it reduce a bit. The result will be the tastiest beef broth you’ve ever tried.

 

8. To give the broth the nice color we are familiar with:

• Cut a big onion in half and place in a heavy iron pan on the stove, cut-side face down, burn until the cut face side is black.

• Boil the onion together with the meat and the rest of the vegetables in the broth.